Eating Words: A Norton Anthology of Food Writing

An excellent survey of foodstuff writing from the classical global to the present.

Edited by means of influential literary critic Sandra M. Gilbert and award-winning eating place critic and professor of English Roger Porter, Eating Words gathers meals writing of literary contrast and significant old sweep into one groundbreaking quantity. starting with the taboos of the outdated testomony and the tastes of historic Rome, and together with go back and forth essays, polemics, memoirs, and poems, the ebook is split into sections equivalent to "Food Writing via History," "At the kinfolk Hearth," "Hunger video games: The pride and Dread of Eating," "Kitchen Practices," and "Food Politics."

Selections from writings by way of Julia baby, Anthony Bourdain, invoice Buford, Michael Pollan, Molly O'Neill, Calvin Trillin, and Adam Gopnik, besides works through authors no longer frequently linked to gastronomy—Maxine Hong Kingston, Henry Louis Gates Jr., Hemingway, Chekhov, and David Foster Wallace—enliven and enhance this entire anthology. "We reside within the golden age of meals writing," declares Ruth Reichl in her preface to this savory dinner party of literature, vital for any nutrition lover. Eating Words indicates how correct she is.

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Extra info for Eating Words: A Norton Anthology of Food Writing

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This silence seems significant because it is connected to a larger tendency on his part to underplay tensions, divisions, opposition of all kinds—social, cultural, and religious. In an autobiographical fragment Brown remarked (with a touch of self-criticism) that British functionalist anthropology has had “a tendency to isolate the holy man . . ” Brown preferred, instead, to focus on elements shared by an entire community. I agree totally with the objections, raised in the first chapter of The Cult of Saints, to the more or less openly paternalistic spirit with which the religious history of illiterate groups has been studied.

40 . montaigne, cannibals, and grottoes architectural jargon does not imply a disregard for architecture. His Journal de voyage en Italie proves just the opposite. Here is how he describes the Medici villa at Pratolino, near Florence: There is . . a grotto, consisting of several cells, which is the finest we ever saw. It is formed, and all crusted over, with a certain material, which they told us was brought from some particular mountain; the wood-work is all ingeniously fastened together with invisible nails.

Vitruvius, De architectura (Como, 1521). 40 . montaigne, cannibals, and grottoes architectural jargon does not imply a disregard for architecture. His Journal de voyage en Italie proves just the opposite. Here is how he describes the Medici villa at Pratolino, near Florence: There is . . a grotto, consisting of several cells, which is the finest we ever saw. It is formed, and all crusted over, with a certain material, which they told us was brought from some particular mountain; the wood-work is all ingeniously fastened together with invisible nails.

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